Volume 17(1), 2021-06, 81—112

Novel and experimental music technology use in the music classroom: Learning performance, experience, and concentrated behavior

Andrew Danso
Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies
University of Jyväskylä
Finland

Rebekah Rousi
Cognitive Science,
Department of Computer Science and Information Systems
University of Jyväskylä
Finland

Marc Thompson
Department of Music, Art and Culture Studies
University of Jyväskylä
Finland

In recent years, music technology in the classroom has relied on general devices such as the iPad. In the current study, we used a mixed-methods approach to examine the learning performance, learning experience, and behavior of two class groups of primary school music students (N = 42), using established music technology (i.e., the iPad with the Keyboard Touch Instrument app) and novel music technology (KAiKU Music Glove). Results show a significant difference of change in test scores during learning (p = <.01) and a medium effect-size is found (d = .75), indicating use of the iPad and Keyboard Touch Instrument app contributed to increased learning when compared to the KAiKU Music Glove. Perceived ease of use ratings of both technologies and observable levels of concentration exhibited by the students are also discussed in the paper. Implications provide insights into the usage and development of embodied music technology in the music classroom.

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